Back To Basics

Seitz and Sirens is a national Emergency Preparedness Training Company.
Our back to basics podcast was created to make what are sometimes complex medical topics easy to understand and retain for students of emergency medicine.

Hosted ByChris Seitz, MD and Jason Seitz, EMT-P, RN

Seitz and Sirens is a national Emergency Preparedness Training Company.
Our back to basics podcast was created to make what are sometimes complex medical topics easy to understand and retain for students of emergency medicine.


All Episodes

Stability – Undefinable or misunderstood

How can we really tell if a patient is stable or not? Do we rely on blood pressure and vital signs? In Episode 8 Jason and Chris discuss how...

Narcan and Cardiac Arrest

In this episode, the Seitz brothers discuss the new Emergency Cardiovascular Care guidelines for Narcan use in cardiac arrest. They also go over the mechanism of action of Narcan...

Chest pain and Arrhythmias

Your patient has chest pain and an arrhythmia. Which came first? Did the chest pain cause the arrhythmia or is the arrhythmia causing chest pain? Which one do we...

Amputations

Dealing with amputation injuries can be intimidating and stressful in the field. In this episode, Chris and Jason go over how to handle these types of injuries as well...

Do Not Resuscitate Orders

In this episode, Chris and Jason discuss what a DNR order is, and what it is not. Do we still treat pain and infection in patients with DNR orders?...

Diving Emergencies

On this episode Chris and Jason discuss everything you need to know about drowning and dive emergencies. As experienced divers themselves, they share their knowledge and expertise on the...

Pulmonary Embolisms and the Danger of Assumptions

In this episode Chris and Jason go over the ins and outs of pulmonary embolisms. They cover the pathophysiology, presentation and treatments of this life threatening and sometimes fatal...

Penetrating Chest Trauma

In this premier episode of the Back to Basics podcast, Chris and Jason discuss a case of penetrating chest trauma and CPR. When do we remove a penetrating object?...